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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the commerce and industry have visited capital this week. the group is headed by the chairman. they have meetings with vietnam's minister of industry and trade and the representative of the chairman of commerce. the goal is to expand their business in the country. following the recent japan protest he's growing anxious about china. employees with their own business were to remain inside their hotel. >> translator: i cannot easily dispel my risks about operating in china. it made me think we should start considering moving our business somewhere else. >> reporter: vietnam has been trying to end foreign problems. the timing couldn't be better for vietnam. >> translator: the people have positive feelings about japan. they are facing problems but we don't have to worry. in that sense there's no mental stress. >> reporter: east asian countries look impressive. >>> spanish leaders are poised to make stringent cuts in their latest budget plans. they too are tighten their belts. ramin, you showed us those pictures from greece. now this. >> reporter: the focus is going to be on spain. many are qu
it harder for european companies to compete on the same level. the commerce ministry of china says it is deeply regrets this eu decision. very, very cross. let's have a listen. >> restricting chinese exports will hurt the interests of both chinese and european industry. no doubt about it. however cheap the products are, manufacturers are suffering because the speed of which this industry has ramped up over the last few years as well as falling demand in europe because the financial crisis. companies in china are hemorrhaging red ink just like their counterparts in europe. >> will china retaliate? that threat is on the table at the moment. >> there is the big airline news. qantas is in trouble but it is hitching up with emirates. >> it the momentous day in airline history. qantas has made its biggest ever arrangement in its airline. it is tied up with emirates. they have signed a 10-year deal which will see qantas getting rid of its singapore hub. the hub will now be in dubai. the co-chairmen arrangement with british airways is gone after 20 years. this is more just a code-sharing a
to create the best. >> he became the commerce minister and one of the two dozen people who run china. but the communist party says all along he was corrupt. the news announced he will go on trial. it said he had abused his power, taking bribes and done serious damage to the image of china. the trigger for the downfall, the death in china last year of the british businessman neil ha yward. his wife was found guilty of murder and he is accused of trying to cover-up for crime. but not everybody believes the case is simple. one of the top forensic scientist told the bbc in her opinion there is no evidence he was poisoned with cyanide. >> there were no signs of cyanide. it would harm caused immediate debt. his skin should have patches. his blood should have been a bright red. >> whatever the truth, the party will install new leaders in november who will rule for the next decade. bo xilai will not be one of them. the communist party has been tainted by this scandal. it now wants to wrap it up. the prosecuting of bo xilai will raise more questions. how did he get away with so much for so lo
in a whole new way. we have teamed up with the minnesota department of commerce to give back free, yes free, money right in the middle of the mall. >> you guys want to find some money? >> reporter: there's just one problem. >> want some money? you sure? >> reporter: these skeptical shoppers don't believe us. >> you guys want to look up unclaimed property to see you have any unclaimed money. we got thousands of dollars. millions of dollars. >> reporter: but they should. statistics show 1 in 10 of us has unclaimed money waiting. it comes from things like, forgotten apartment security deposits. final paychecks that you didn't pick up and money left to you by loved ones. the states hold it for their citizens. minnesota commerce department commissioner loves giving it back. >> you never know, it could be $1,000 or tens of thousands of dollars that's your money. >> reporter: katy westin is one of the doubters. can we change her mind? yes. with a nice find. $675 from her extended family. >> i'm very happy. >> reporter: other shoppers see the hubbub and start to line up at last. it's simple. we hel
can't use it as effectively. >> will we see an e-commerce capability on twitter? >> i think we do see lots of commerce take place every day on twitter. it's particularly interesting in areas with things like perishable inventory like tickets. the game or show starts in x hours. if we don't sell the tickets there is nothing we can do with them. we are paying attention to that and are thinking about ways to participate in the value exchange. we'll see what happens. >> what's your biggest challenge from a revenue perspective? >> our biggest advertising challenge is making sure our revenue reflects is percentage of users that exist -- that use twitter in various countries. we have users all over the world. the user base is growing globally fast. we need to expand our advertising platform globally beyond just a couple countries we are in now. >> you can watch the entire interview including his answers to questions that were tweeted in by our viewers on mediamoney.cnbc.com. >> before we let you go, you talked to him about a myriad of things certainly. you asked whether he was going to go pu
'll do. there is a lot of commerce that flows through the area. we're out there showing that that commerce can get through. melissa: yeah. so much oil flows through this region it is essential. what is it like when they come check you out? >> it is actually pretty neat to see what that is. we have had the russians as well swris tinge us. it is always interesting to see, you hear the stories of the big bad wolf, but when you see the people close and in perp and ships alongside, normal sailors like yourself a lot of times sailing alongside looking across, looking across the water from each other. actually, brings it closer to home. melissa: what's the impression, what kind of impact do you make on them? >> i imagine we bother them a little bit that we go through each time and, i know they get on the radio or they make their, their announcements in their news how they dislike it. and i imagine no country likes that with so much american presence or any other coalition presence going through here. melissa: what do you think is the impression that the fleet gives off? what is
and republican george allen, hosted by the fairfax county chamber of commerce. i am a moderator of today's event. i want to cover the rules of today's event. it will last one hour and will begin with opening statements, and then the panelists and i will pose questions. those questions are determined by the panelists, by us. they have not been reviewed by the fairfax chamber. each candidate will have one minute, 30 seconds to respond, and there will be an additional one-minute rebuttal. i reserve the right to be able to follow up with some questions as i see fit as the moderator. we will end with a two-minute closing statement from each candidate. there is a clock in front of each candidate noting the time. we have the northern virginia no bureau chief -- the northern virginia wrote -- northern virginia bureau chief with us, and there is a man who joined "the washington post" after being with another organization. and a man that attended virginia commonwealth university is with us. let's begin by hearing the candidates and their opening statements. the order was determined by a coin toss earlier
business. here's the latest. >> that's right. facebook is making its first move into e-commerce. facebook gifts for the first time allows users to buy its first real products on the service, allowing users to buy gifts. facebook gives users the ability to take advantage of millions of users' birthday wishes. users can send gifts privately or publicly, and people receiving gifts can unwrap a virtual preview and open the real gift in person a few days later. this is designed to be easy, make it easy for users to spend money. users can pay right away or add payment details later. facebook does take a cut of all transactions. investors have been on lookout for facebook's crucial move into the revenue stream since the company acquired a mobile gifting app called karma back in may. the fact this is a native mobile appoints to the fact facebook is looking for new ways to make money from its growing mobile user base. though this is a test, maria, once people start inputting their credit cards into facebook, the potential for social commerce seems huge. back over to you. >> thank you, julia. resea
-owned businesses in india. india's commerce department says the move will help with the slowing economy there. the markets are soaring in america. shows you what a little stimulus can do. if only it was as easy to stimulate the economy of the eurozone. but maybe all that bond-buying is doing some good. that was talked about in a 2-day meeting in cyprus that began friday. let's talk with greg hadley. he's president of the bull & bear institute. in regard to what's been going on in europe, are you bullish or bearish? > > you know what, i'm a little bit of both. if you look at it, the ecb, by buying up the short-term notes of basically the pigs, greece- > > that's a key point, though: they're buying the short-term notes. > > it's the short-term notes, which really has been the problem for these countries, is how do they get the short-term financing to continue their governments? they are looking at it, and basically this is a short-term fix on a long-term problem. the structural problems in the eurozone will continue to exist. in fact, right now greece is asking whether or not they should renego
of economic news. the dow jones industrial climbed 72 points. nasdaq added 42 points. >>> first step into e-commerce, the new service called gift. memo park company launched gift with select vendors today. new users will be able to click on ipod and send a friend a gift card, chocolates or other real-life presents. it'll also remind you about events such as birthdays or weddings. >>> a week-long celebration will culminate in san francisco tomorrow night. david stevenson tells us how thousands of cyclists are set to take over the streets. >> critical mass cyclists are rolling in san francisco from around the country and around the world to celebrate the movement's 20th anniversary in its home city. >> when it first started in 92 ae, bicycling was not a mainstream thing. if you were biking you were harassed. >> take over the streets on the last friday of the month. >> the whole idea is it's not a protest. it's basically a community like a bubble of safety moving through traffic. >> it has inspierd similar events around the world that played a part in the explosive growth of bay area cycling and its em
, transnational crime and terrorism, enhancing commerce between nations and dealing with climate change. it requires courage and leadership to take the first step to a mutual understanding. i've been particularly impressed recently with juan manuel santos, the president of colombia, as he reaches out to two of his neighbors to restore diplomatic relations. .. against the people of cuba and that we display no interest in furthering or improving diplomatic relations. all us should continue to press the cuban government but the embargo undermines any credibility that my country has in calling for improvements in cuba. and i fear our democracy-aid program is aimed at regime change and does not promote democracy. unfortunately, the program is used by some in cuba to justify cuban-american gross who i know might believe to be innocent and keep him in prison. a more sincere diagnose should be held with -- the main reason that united states keeps cuba on the list is that because the et a have officers in cuba, but when i was last in havana, the columbian and the spanish told me that having them
chamber of commerce. seven years ago we talked about transportation, and right outside this building there wasn't a rail to dulles being built. i was very proud to work on those with you in my time as governor. we talked about education. during my time as governor, we put in place the largest bond package to expand our higher ed institutions in the history of the commonwealth, and now there's significant construction at both george mason and the northern virginia community college campuses and expanded preconsidered -- prekindergarten. we landed marquee companies hilton, volkswagen of north america, northrup gum monday announced they were coming to the neighborhood. we also won accolades as the best state for business every year of my four years as governor. i'm proud of those accomplishments, i'm proud that we did them together. but i'm especially proud that we did 'em in the midst of the worst e are session -- recession since the 1930s. today we're here because we have a senate to be fixed. we've got to fix congress to end gridlock that's blocking progress to important goals. we ha
with the consequences. ashley: right over the top. and facebook is getting into the e-commerce business. allowing you to send real gifts to your virtual friends but the question is, will it be a gift for company shareholders? we'll be asking an analyst. tracy: don't get that virtual stuff. anyway, top of the hour. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole, we were just talking about it. spain kind of helping us back again today, huh? >> that's right. when we talk about spain again, spain again and that sometimes hits our markets but today we'll say it's spain again but in this case it is good news that the bank stress tests came in better-than-expected. they weren't as bad as they could have been. of course there are still banks that need to raise more capital and such but overall, it was pretty good news. so what you saw was that the dow came up off the lows. it almost hit that unchanged line. it was down over 100 points. we're looking at longer term charts here. this is a one-month chart. for the one-month we're up almost 3%. fo
or a store or some sort of commerce. >> they talk about first strike advantage. we were discussing online today google trucks who go through the streets and take pictures of street views. there was one in our neighborhood the other day. google has had a lot of time to not only refine their images, but their algorithms, right? so you can put in -- snet of for monte brothers, you put in bros and it's going to find it for you, jim. >> i love the way my house in summit looks on google. >> is it bigger? >> truly, you might say it's bigger. remember that? >> yes. how can i forget? >> the place i have in mexico, it has three angles, i found in my irish public book they directed me to some of the best publics and i was never lost once. that's my kind of device. >> it is. now you're going to get to the eiffel tower. >> in ireland. >> it's going work out well for you. >> it's a lingering question, though. there's no question that the demand for the iphone 5 is strong. there's a question about whether people will be satisfied because of the lcd sources, sharp was one of the three suppliers of the lc
, i have a sou soundbyte from the chamber of commerce about this. >> the rich are not getting richer. the tax measures that have been implemented over the last three years have hit all social classes, including the upper to middle class here in greece. we've seen property taxes that have been increased immensely. business taxation, unfortunately, is running at the moment at approximately 50% when you add the business tax, the dividend tax, including all the extraordinary taxation measures that have been implemented over the last two and a half years. so there isn't so much inequality as far as that side is concerned. >> yeah. and, you know, when we talk about greece, which is, you know, really a small part of the european union in a financial sense, tomorrow the spanish are handing down their budget. spain is a huge deal. they are at the epicenter of european financial crisis. you know, if they need money, you know, this is the contagion that could condition. >> it all has -- eventually it spills over to the united states and the financial impact here. michael, thank you very much. a
creation. norelco held near two-year highs. according to the commerce department, sales fell to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 373,000 which was below what economists were looking for, meanwhile, home prices jumped to their highest levels in more than five years. and greece's international lenders are at odds over how to solve the country's debt crisis. the imf has been pushing to restructure greek's debt owed to foreign creditors. e.u. leaders prefer to give greece more time to meet bailout goals. well, here we are at 30 minutes to go, actually, 20 minute toss go. of let's get a check on the markets with nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. you've got one of today's top s&p 500 movers. what do you have? >> reporter: oh, yeah. taking a look at dean foods, right? i pulled it up nice and big for us. it's up a full five percentage points right now. dean foods clearly a winner on the s&p 500, and why is that? because they are confirming that they are scoring a potential sale of their morningstar dairy operations. as a result, you see that being a winner. a lot
of navigation occurs through that very critical strait. it is well-known the amount of trade and commerce that goes through there. so just take a look what goes through there. liquified natural gas, huge product that comes out of the country of qatar. oil products imports, exports. not only impacts the united states but very much asian countries. japan gets 3/4 of all her fuel and resources from this region. china 50% of all her resources. so our job here is just make sure that stays open. we do have resources to do that. we go through the strait of hormuz not necessarily looking but making sure we're continuing to move back and forth and everybody has freedom of navigation through that route. >> you mentioned how much oil and liquified natural gas and fuel, asia gets through the straight. some made the argument they should be the ones out here patrolling. how do you feel about that? >> we have the resources to do it. it is a global economy. it is not just about our navy. you heard this line saying we're a global force for good. it isn't just for the united states. it is for the world. ad
based on the north american free trade agreement that promoted much greater commerce between mexico, the united states, and also canada. >> do you feel we are on pace to have enough open trade in this country, and then there are people on both sides of the aisle to get very touchy about trade with china. >> i think sometimes they get a pretty bum rap. we have trade agreements with colombia and south korea and with panama. that was a very important development. colombia, a country that is just really coming through a very difficult internal war, they need that kind of trade. and they are a real model country in terms of economic development. china, we have some issues at the moment. we have some issues with russia. but in the long run, yes, i believe that further liberalize trade with the rest of the world by protecting our intellectual property and those kinds of things, we have to pursue that. liz: ambassador john negroponte. ambassador to the philippines as well. thank you very much for joining us. a perfect segue. coming up in the next hour, we have the former president of colomb
association of manufacturers park chamber of commerce or state associations to get people, businesses concerned about this that have been benefiting from these tax incentives, and would see them come off. that is the debate he will see with any tax break coming off this. >> do you think you can go back to the chart that showed the scenarios? it is a complicated chart. the markets in areas. the one with all of the dots. as someone who covers congress and overseas our congressional coverage, i always think of the worst case scenario. congress either doing nothing or kicking the can down the road or doing some version of a -- economic decision with a box. coming up about that scenario? depending on the outcome of the election. there is a lot of scenarios. if we have a status quo election, obama wins, almost an equally divided republican senate and democratic house. then there's the of republican washington scenario. i did not think there is an all democratic washington scenario right now. what is possible versus what -- in the lame duck and then into generic -- january and how do the mar
budgets of the departments of commerce, education, energy, homeland security, interior, justice, state, plus the federal courts. so how is it that we're able to borrow so much money and pay so little interest on it? why aren't we like spain or italy or greece? if sorting out because we will manage our finances, or that we have a political system that seems to be a marvel of efficiency of compromise and comedy. it's because the rest of the world looks even worse. the united states is the world's tallest midget when it comes to borrowing money. if this could go on for ever, it would be fantastic. it is not going to go on forever. i have no clue when it's going to in but it's not going to go on forever. as interest rates return to normal, the share of the federal budget that goes to interest is going to rise. and that will crowd that spending on other things. it means they will pay taxes and will borrow money and some of the money would borrow will go to pay interest on the money we borrowed flashy. some of taxes we pay will go to pay interest to our creditors. and those creditors are inc
of chinese commerce. after weeks of going straight dow, the key shipping index has reverted sharply to the upside. the iron ore stocks are roaring too. now, look, i got enormous respect for the bears on china, led by tomorrow's "squawk box" sques jim chanos. he is one of the brightest i've ever met. i have no chinese stocks. have i from time to time, but no chinese stocks i think you should buy. i also think the chinese interest rates are way too high. the stimulus is too small to matter. all that said, the possibility that china isn't falling off a cliff could be good news for the world economy. if china stops decelerating, it would be a pleasant global surprise. you know i think the united states is the best place to invest in the world. i worry about europe's recession, japan's secular decline, india's inflation, and yes, china's deceleration. not to mention our own looming financial clift. well could conceively go to new highs. i think the u.s. issue is the most likely to be solved because it's about political will. but the green shoots out of china, they tell me stop being as n
filed last week hit the lowest level in two months. but the commerce department revised its estimate of second quarter economic growth from 1.7% down to 1.3%. the economic numbers were fodder for republican presidential nominee mitt romney. at a campaign stop in springfield, virginia he said the slow growth was proof that president obama's economic policies have not worked. >> if you don't believe me why look at the price of gas and the jobs in your community and the members of your family that are struggling for good work. if you don't believe me look at the numbers that just came out in the growth of our economy. 1.3% versus russia at 4%, china at 7-8%, we are at 1.3% this is unacceptable. it is not working. i know what it takes to get things working. >> sreenivasan: 200 miles away in virginia beach, president obama acknowledged the economy is still struggling. but he also promised the crowd he'll push for an era of what he called economic patriotism. >> during campaign season you always hear a lot about patriotism. well you know what? it's time for a new economic patriotism. an ec
92%. facebook is rallying today, though, avilan muching its e commerce gifts feature as we head into q 4. we want to hit another channel check. cnbc's running theme all day long. julia borsten on the social media. >> here's what to watch for in the social sector in the quarter ahead. it's all about growth. can social companies like facebook, zenga and groupon return to accelerating growth. will advertisers ship more dollars than just social? on october 23rd facebook reports its quarterly results. we'll be looking for updates on how the social network plans to make money, particularly from its fast-growing mobile user base. zynga mobile users are waiting to see if it can gain in declines. we'll see if groupon can turn its new ventures like mobile payments into new profits. for social i'm julia borsten. >>> don't miss julia's exclusive interview with facebook's sheryl sandberg. it is her first interview since the ipo came out back in may. it is only on cnbc on monday. sue? >>> ty, we are watching apple as you know. the iphone 5 rolling out worldwide today to 22 more countries. app
into local commerce. similarly amazon built up hundreds of customers and had the relationship to build up books and music and all those categories. liz: i remember how they did that can they survive on books. >> they have proven that one out. liz: sim, good to see you. we'll watch you continue to prove yourself. great to see a company growing. are you hiring, really quickly? >> yeah, we continue to hire well into the foreseeable future. liz: cofounder and ceo, tim shaughnessy. david: good stuff, cheap tickets. i phone 5 sales coming in way below analyst expectations. will a drop in apple's stock continue or will it be up again tomorrow? we'll explore that next liz: most people think this is great. apple's iphone find topping sales. david: they still fell short of analyst estimates. you have the expectations if it doesn't meet it. then there's a problem. fox business's lauren simonetti has the details. >> it is expectations. it is kind of a silly story, right? they sold more than five million in opening weekends. what analysts were expecting sometimes double. if you look what gene munster
the constitutionality of the law in its totality as a related to the commerce clause and the individual mandate. we began that litigation and motions were filed by the government and then the case was taken to the supreme court. after the decision, i filed a motion to lift the stay in oklahoma asking the judge to consider an amendment to our complaint. as you know, the original challenge about the constitutionality of the law, this is about implementation. this addresses the concerns about the irs ruled that was adopted on may 18 and the affordable care act's implementation of the employer mandate, the penalty that is known under the law dealing with large employers. our lawsuit is about that r ule and is seeking to hold government accountable as it relates to implementing that portion of the a lot. host: what about that part of the law is unconstitutional? what are you arguing? guest: the specifics include that under the aca, if a state is not the bar -- adopt an exchange, the tax credits do not issue to that state and the employer mandate penalty does not accrue, either. the irs disregarded that
think about the e-commerce experience right now? it doesn't seem like you're spending a lot of must be on advertising online right now on that issue. >> we spend about 0.0000, which having the phenomenal 90% growth that we have on e-commerce, i think speaks for itself and it's driven by product. it's driven by a relationship in the stores and the guests really seeking us out, and so it's all organic growth. >> is that something that changes over time? >> i think you never say never. i think what we always look for is a real true authentic connection with the guests and that we've really earned it rather than that we've bought it, and that's been our philosophy all along, and the guest have resonated with that because they're always in choice about choosing our product and our job is to keep it the best product ever and be in an authentic relationship with the guests and we've built the brand on that and continue to see that as our strength. >> christine, thank you very much for joining us today. pleasure talking to you. >> pleasure, thank you. >> thank you. >> they make boxers? >> y
to those reforms. we know that american businesses are faced with an unbelievably complicated and commerce and tax code, combined over 30% on businesses. not to mention the problems with the estate taxes. it makes the u.s. as the second highest corporate tax rate among developed nations in the world. and so the u.s. federal rate is 35%. it's nearly 10 percentage points higher than other -- our other competitors. so that on top of all of the other issues that we've highlighted, where in order to create -- know, i mentioned the manufacturing jobs. i don't know about you but i get this question all the time, where have all the manufacturing jobs gone. and people always highlight that we've just chased these jobs offshore and it's because we have created this environment in which business owners don't have a choice. if they're going to turn a profit they have to do what is the benefit for their families and to make that hard-earned llar. i remember hearing a colleague give an example, he was sitting on an airplane next to a guy that made things. he made things, he produced a product and he wan
of these issues. but the absolute core issue is bankers are meant to help service commerce, not be a barrier that gets in the way. >> reporter: so this commission will be looking at regulation and potential policy changes around uk banking. they'll report back with proposed legislation, coming into christmas. december 18th is when they're expected to report. lots more evidence expected to be reported. >> thank you so much. james ferguson is still with us. there's so much going on with the uk. what is interesting is we're trying to -- the uk is setting up its own regulations, whether we're heading into direct conflict with the what the eu might be proposing because they're going to rip up the eba and have extended powers over uk banks, whether we're heading for a collision here. >> if europe's problem is that everyone has the same policy but all have different fiscal policies, different tax rates, we've got the same issue potentially brug here with banking.ewing here with banking. if they have to be bailed out by the taxpayers, which tax pay sne ers? maybe we should make the decision whether
and they would be sing examining dancing if they had been as hoe as they are in inverted commerce. we caught up with some very academic important men in german, the academic mentor, and asked him some of these questions. for example, what the esm should look like and what the ecb could or could not do. here's what he had to say. >> the problem is that a change, the old friend of policymaking because up until now it was forbidden -- it was a rule not to buy bonds and you understand when they started in 2010 is, well, we have to buy some bonds simply to keep the market floating, to keep them flexible. but meanwhile, it's clear, this is not the idea. so, now the idea is simply to support governments. >> one of the problems of massive bond buying programs is that it knocks the whole market system out of sync, so to speak. it's much easier for governments to buy bonds. this is what the professor also warned about. >> the banks are really financing the governments at this time. and you see there is also specialty because if a bank gives a loan to a private company, then they have to have capital. if
of the indexes. you see bank of ireland up there and unicredit, commerce bank. >> yes, we do take some collective long positions. for example in italy where we see economy be more solid than in spain and not suffering from what spanish banks are exceeding. today the imf is supporting plan of investment from the esm into irish banks that would lighten up irish debt. there is a combination of bad policies aimeded a repping the regions and banks which are very large problems and structural problems in the economy like very high unemployment. so already a very bad macro situation, on top of that the government is persisting into policy stakes that haven't worked before. >> so selective risks. how about the noneurozone. banks. >> we've always been very positive because there's a better independent policy, many of these countries are a safe haven from the european crisis. on the other hand, the up side has become lower and lower has safe havens have become more popular. so the bonds from these banks now trade at half the extra spread than bonds in the semicore eurozone countries like france or the peri
and commerce bank are named. >> is the british public ready to sell their stake to a chinese company? i don't know. we're open for business, you but we need to see the profit on the table. >> the world's top designers have been showcasing their latest collections in london. i went down to check out the shows and find out just what the forecast is for the luxury market. asked vivian westwood where she sees pockets of growth. >> at the moment, it's in china. if you didn't have the chinese buying things, then the fashion business would be completely on the floor. it won't migrate to africa, you know. it's just not going to happen. by then, we'll be frying by then in this climate change. we've got to do things in between. if we do things in between, i don't know where we'll be in the future. but i have far too much product. the nation of the fashion business is that in order to support the nucleus of what you do, there are so many spinoffs that you have to have because it has to be subsidized by these spinoffs. what i do would lose money if it didn't up the spinoffs. i don't know. it's just a w
economy, what are you seeing? >> we know that china's commerce ministry called on japan to take complete responsibility for any trade fallout, but latest china fdi numbers show china has a lot to lose as well. japanese investment increased 16.2% in the first eight months. but that's much slower than the 50% increase in 2011. on the whole, down 1.4% on year, but that's higher than that of july. january to august, investment inflow declined 4.3% from the previous year. if you look at a breakdown, debt-plagued europe was the weak spot. investment from the u.s. declined 2.8%. foreign investment into the agricultural sector tumbled nearly 15% on year, but the silver lining was in the services sector, hired by over 5% on growing domestic demand. >> i want to thank you very much for sticking around and sharing your thoughts on everything happening. sixuan, we'll see you a little bit later in the program. >>> let's bring you up to speed where we are, just an hour and 15 minutes into trade. after losses yesterday, this is where we stand right now for european equity markets. there's a number of s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 72 (some duplicates have been removed)

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